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<em>Centerfolds</em> | Jay Shinn | April 2 - May 7 , 2011 <em>Centerfolds</em> | Jay Shinn | April 2 - May 7 , 2011 <em>Centerfolds</em> | Jay Shinn | April 2 - May 7 , 2011 <em>Centerfolds</em> | Jay Shinn | April 2 - May 7 , 2011 <em>Centerfolds</em> | Jay Shinn | April 2 - May 7 , 2011 <em>Centerfolds</em> | Jay Shinn | April 2 - May 7 , 2011 <em>Centerfolds</em> | Jay Shinn | April 2 - May 7 , 2011 <em>Centerfolds</em> | Jay Shinn | April 2 - May 7 , 2011 <em>Centerfolds</em> | Jay Shinn | April 2 - May 7 , 2011
<em>Centerfolds</em> | Jay Shinn | April 2 - May 7 , 2011 <em>Centerfolds</em> | Jay Shinn | April 2 - May 7 , 2011 <em>Centerfolds</em> | Jay Shinn | April 2 - May 7 , 2011 <em>Centerfolds</em> | Jay Shinn | April 2 - May 7 , 2011

PRESS RELEASE

Jay Shinn Centerfolds
April 2 - May 7 , 2011

Marty Walker Gallery is pleased to present a solo exhibition of new work by Jay Shinn. In his new exhibition, Centerfolds, Jay Shinn deftly manipulates space, light, shadow, and shape, with sharp minimalist work that actively alters viewer’s perceptions by continuously shifting between two-and-three-dimensional planes.

Jay Shinn’s arrangements imply movement and balance as they evoke pathways, thresholds and mandala-like plans, while also asking the viewer to understand each form by approaching it from various positions. This limbic awareness along with the work’s clean lines suggests a correspondence with art historical minimalism. Among these antecedents, Shinn’s work resonates strongly with the linear constructions of Fred Sandback and Agnes Martin, and increasingly the light and space installations of Robert Irwin and James Turrell. Shinn’s sculptural “op art” does not explicitly distill or represent nature but envisions experiences analogous to it. His recent works thus provide a refuge from the complexities of the world while quietly immersing us in its manifold visual phenomena. –Kurt Mueller, artist & writer, Houston, TX

Three-dimensional geometric structures comprised of light projections, faux and real shadows, ambiguous forms of neon tubes, Plexiglas, and paint trick the eye’s perception of shape and dimension, often displacing a sense of ground and gravity. Manipulations are slight, nearly undetectable, yet remarkably ethereal and enchantingly serene.

Shinn, a graduate of the Kansas City Art Institute and former resident of the Skowhegan School of Painting and Sculpture, the New York School of Visual arts, and Takt Kunstprojektraum in Berlin, Germany, lives and works in Dallas, TX and New York City. Shinn€s work is part of several public and corporate collections including Microsoft, Neiman Marcus Collection, W Hotels, and the Dallas/Fort Worth International Airport.

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